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WOTY 3.2
Jun
26
to Sep 14

WOTY 3.2

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Photograph by Wayn Reid

WOTY 3.2: Scales 

Scales

Curated by Simon Benjamin

Participating Artists: Nate Bernard, Terrell Daniel, Brandon Edwards, Brian Felipe, Keonna Foreman, Kara Mills, Wayn O. Reid, Christopher Rivera, Audreamia Wardlow, Christopher Zapata.

Scales brings together the work of young people involved in youth-oriented programs focused on creating and sustaining a more just and inclusive society. The exhibition features the work of three artists from a talent development agency for young people of color called SOW (Scope of Work) and six artists from Recess Assembly - a program that offers an inroad to art as an alternative for incarcerating young people inside the justice system.

Through their artistic practice, these young artists highlight under-recognized subjects that impact their communities both directly and indirectly. Through intimate photographs, Wayn O. Reid, a first generation Jamaican-American works through questions of home, belonging and the erasure of histories through forced and voluntary migration. Audreamia Wardlow’s sugar sculptures consider the complexity and impact of mass produced consumer goods in urban communities. Christopher Zapata’s short films are an inquiry into his identity as an Afro-Latinx person. A collective of artists working together at Recess Assembly designed and screen printed a series of posters responding to the curatorial prompt – What does Justice look like to you?

It is today’s youth that hold the position of being the influencers of culture and change that ripple outward into wider communities. The definition of Justice is not a static one, and these artists are voices among the many of their generation working on tipping the scales of Justice towards a more equitable society.

More on the youth focused programs:

SOW is a talent development agency for young POC creatives between the ages of 17-24, established in response to the inequity in representation in creative industries in New York City. SOW honors young people by fostering opportunities through to become creators of culture, not just consumers of it. SOW confronts the cycles of exploitation, erasure of narratives, and marginalization of youth within the creative industry. @sow.nyc

Recess Assembly offers young people caught up in the justice system an inroad to art and connections to working artists and serves as an alternative to incarceration while empowering participants to take charge of their own life story and imagine a positive future. Participants that complete the program may have their cases sealed avoiding an adult record– which can be transformative to their lives. Participants may stay involved at Recess through paid opportunities at Peer Leaders and/or through an Artist Apprenticeship track. @recessart

Simon Benjamin is a Jamaican multidisciplinary artist invested in a research based art practice. He is based in New York City where he is currently pursuing an MFA at Hunter College. @brooklynbeachouse



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WOTY 3.1
Apr
12
to Jun 15

WOTY 3.1

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WOTY_3.1-image.png

WOTY 3.1: Polos Opuestos 

Polos Opuestos

Javier Castro

Groana Melendez

Curated by Arden Sherman, Director & Curator of Hunter East Harlem Gallery

The exhibition project, Word of the Year (WOTY), is now in its third iteration. For the first time, we have decided to include the word of the year from two sources: the United States-based Merriam Webster Dictionary, and our regular source, the Oxford English Dictionary. The 2018 words of the year are Toxic (Oxford) and Justice (Merriam).

For this exhibition, titled Polos Opuestos (English translation: Poles Apart), “opposition” is the driving conceptual framework, underlining the opposing ideas of the definition of the words of the year. Two video monitors have been installed on the WOTY wall, each one displaying video artwork. 

Representing Justice, Javier Castro’s video, The Golden Age, shows the artist interviewing Cuban children about what they want to be when they grow up. Cuba is Castro’s homeland and his gesture of asking the simple question about the children’s dreams, the artist symbolizes the need for justice and freedom in a country where a dictatorship is still in power. Justice is more pertinent to Cubans now than ever, where the political climate is rapidly progressing, but for children who imagine a better future, justice is core to their identities.

The second video work, Miscommunication, by Groana Melendez, addresses the word Toxic. In her work, Melendez, a first-generation Dominican-American, is observed attempting to force a marriage between a stack of magnets. The magnets furiously repel each other and the artist is in constant battle with the opposition. Melendez’s work explores her own complex identity within a family fractured by emigration and a reality disrupted by toxicity: borders, harsh immigration conditions, and geographical barriers between loved ones. 

Both pieces in WOTY: Polos Opuestos work in tandem to highlight the opposing nature of the words Justice and Toxic, while simultaneously inviting the viewer to make their own connections about current political landscapes, cultural localities, social circumstances, and the concerns of contemporary artists.  

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WOTY 2.1
Feb
1
to Mar 1

WOTY 2.1

E96A4732_August 14, 2017 - by JayEsPhotography.com.jpg

Living Proof

In Shellyne Rodriguez' works, youth is part of a larger, intergenerational struggle for survival. As a means of showing youthful ingenuity in the face of systemic oppression, her works depict youth and utilize found objects, such as discarded, taped-together boxes carried by "Candy Boy" salesmen on the train. Rodriguez' engagement with young audiences is also evident in her assemblages, which integrate prints that were made during art-making workshops. The phrase, Hay hambre [there is hunger], visible in the assemblage, For Korynn Gaines, was created by the artist and the undocumented children who participated in one such session. In Rodriguez' words: "The phrase speaks to hunger grumbling in the belly, but also the drive to live and to thrive beyond the borders or the obstacles threatening to swallow them.”

Curated by Irini Zervas and Lauren Fowler

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Nov
15
to Jan 15

WOTY 1.2

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WOTY 1.2 After Truth New work by T. Eliott Mansa

WOTY 1.2

New work by T. Eliott Mansa

HEHG Hallway Wall
2180 3rd Ave at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

Nov 15, 2017 – Jan 15, 2018

This exhibition features new paintings and relief sculpture by T. Eliott Mansa. For the first time in his career, Mansa takes up abstraction to produce his images, bypassing his usual figurative practice. In the past, he began a portrait with the true image of the subject in mind. These preconceived images guided him through practiced movements, and his references—Yoruba cosmology, media imagery, East Harlem storefronts—acted as the scaffolding that helped construct them. Mansa’s new work unfolds without intent or concern for accuracy. In his new relief sculptures, Mansa weaves through identifiable references, such as faux flowers, plants, toys or stuffed animals, and strips them of context, rearranging and recontextualizing them in pursuit of a truth which he cannot anticipate.

Nora Boyd is an independent educator pursuing her master’s in Art History at Hunter College with a focus on global modernist architecture.

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Oct
1
to Nov 15

WOTY 1.1

WOTY 1.1
Double Dialogue

Curated by Kristen Racaniello

HEHG Hallway Wall
2180 3rd Ave at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

Double Dialogue
This multimedia exhibition features the work of artists Kameelah Janan Rasheed and Paul Gagner. Each artist has created an installation dealing with notion of archiving, and their work attempts to unpack the monolithic views of history, truth and reality that dominate culture in the United States. Humor pervades both artist’s work, using oxymorons to point out hypocritical or dualistic thinking. When used as a vehicle for ideas, language can be responsible for conceptions of the singularity of truth and for the social rifts created by conflicting versions of truth. Rasheed and Gagner recognize the tool of language and exaggerate it in their works, thus giving their audience a momentary glimpse of realities alternative to their own. Double Dialogue seeks to draw connections between these two artists’ through their critical analysis of the cultural ironies surrounding them. 

Kristen Racaniello is an independent curator and PhD candidate at the CUNY Grad Center with a focus on Medieval Art History. 

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Oct
1
to Nov 30

Word of the Year

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#nytransit

#nytransit

Word of the Year

Word of the Year is an exhibition project hosted by Hunter East Harlem Gallery, inviting emerging curators to activate the wall at Hunter College's Silberman School of Social Work using Merriam Webster Dictionary and Oxford English Dictionary's "word of the year" from the previous year.

By using a word culled from mass media as a prompt, the exhibition space acts as a site for artists and curators to engage in a dialogue about collective consciousness and understanding how semantics can play a crucial role in shaping public opinion.

Word of the Year 2018: TOXIC & JUSTICE
Definition of Justice: the maintenance or administration of what is just, impartial, or fair. Definition of Toxic: 1. Poisonous, relating to or caused by poison. 2. Very bad, unpleasant, or harmful.

Word of the Year 2017: YOUTHQUAKE
Definition of Youthquake: a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.

Word of the Year 2016: POST-TRUTH
Definition of Post-Truth: an adjective defined as relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.

More information HERE.

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